Landcare in Japan

Tomomi Maekawa

Tomomi Maekawa from Tokyo Institute of Technology

The Institute is playing a role in helping introduce Australia’s highly successful Landcare movement to Japan. Currently it is hosting a Japanese student scholar, Tomomi Maekawa, a PhD student with Tokyo Institute of Technology, who is studying Landcare in Australia. Tomomi is based at the Albury-Wodonga campus. She arrived in Australia at the beginning of June and will be here for a year during which time she will be mentored by Prof Allan Curtis, who has done a lot of research on Landcare.

Last month she was joined by her supervisor Professor Toshio Kuwako from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Michael Seigel and Dr  Kazuki Kagohashi, from Nanzan University. Read more of this post

Murray-Darling Basin Seminar Series

Dr Nicole McCasker, Dr Anthony (Rex) Conalli, Dr Paul Humphries ( and Dr Rick Stoffels (CSIRO/MDFRC) — at Murray Darliing Basin Seminar Series.

Dr Nicole McCasker, Dr Anthony (Rex) Conallin, Dr Paul Humphries ( and Dr Rick Stoffels (CSIRO/MDFRC) — at Murray Darliing Basin Seminar Series.

The first of the seminars in the Mu rray-Darling Basin Seminar Series for 2013 to be hosted by the Institute was held on Wednesday, September 18, at the Albury-Wodonga campus.
Over 40 people joined Dr Paul Humphries, co-editor, Dr Nicole McCasker and Dr Rick Stoffels (CSIRO/MDFRC) co-authors of the book “Ecology of Australian Freshwater Fishes” for the launch of the book, and a joint presentation on “Celebrating Australia’s Freshwater Fish.” Paul, who introduced the presentation with a historical perspective, said there were 30,000 species of fish world-wide, made up of 16,000 marine species, and 14,000 freshwater species.
“And all those freshwater species have to squeeze into a very small amount of water comparative to marine species,” he said. “Australia has relatively few freshwater species, just 260.” This was because Australia is such a dry continent. “Basically the more freshwater you have, the more species.”
Nicole discussed some of the remarkable features of freshwater fish in Australia and how they have adapted to various environmental conditions.
Rick spoke about ‘resistance and resilience’ and how some fish are able to lower their metabolic rate as the amount of oxygen in the water declines.
The book, to which 23 authors contributed, was then launched by Dr Anthony (Rex) Conallin from the Murray CMA.
The Murray-Darling Basin Seminar Series is a collaboration between the MDFRC, La Trobe & Charles Sturt Universities (ILWS), and the North East and Murray CMAs. Its aim is to share information, learn from others and provide a regular opportunity for people to meet and discuss Basin issues.

Australia’s Landcare under international scrutiny

Photo from Left Dr Kazuki Kagohashi, Research Fellow from Nanzan University ; Rob Youl, President of Australian Landcare International; Prof Toshio Kuwako, Tokyo Institute of Technology (and Tomomi’s supervisor); Prof Allan Curtis, ILWS; Tomomi Maekawa, a visiting student scholar (Doctoral) from Tokyo Institute of Technology, and in Australia for a year based here at CSU’s Albury-Wodonga campus; and Prof Michael Seigel, from the Nanzan Institute for Social Ethics, Nanzan University.

Photo from Left Dr Kazuki Kagohashi, Research Fellow from Nanzan University ; Rob Youl, President of Australian Landcare International; Prof Toshio Kuwako, Tokyo Institute of Technology (and Tomomi’s supervisor); Prof Allan Curtis, ILWS; Tomomi Maekawa, a visiting student scholar (Doctoral) from Tokyo Institute of Technology, and in Australia for a year based here at CSU’s Albury-Wodonga campus; and Prof Michael Seigel, from the Nanzan Institute for Social Ethics, Nanzan University.

Ms Tomomi Maekawa, who is a fellow with ILWS and PhD student with Tokyo Institute of Technology, was joined by her supervisor Professor Toshio Kuwako from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Michael Seigel from Nanzan University and another Japanese expert, as well as the chair of Australian Landcare International Mr Rob Youl. During their stay on the Border, the visitors met with local Landcare groups and ILWS research professor Allan Curtis, Australia’s leading expert on the Landcare movement.

Bicycle answer to growing traffic problems?

RideToWorkSWith the car traffic growing around Thurgoona and on its campus, Charles Sturt University (CSU) recently completed research to study how staff and students travelled to and from the Albury-Wodonga campus and why they travelled the way they did. Research project coordinator and social researcher Dr Shelby Gull Laird said many CSU staff and students indicated they would like to ride a bicycle or ride a bus instead or driving their car, but not all of them. Convenience and necessity were the main reasons that over 60 per cent of travellers chose their car as their main means of getting to work and study at CSU. Only five per cent currently travel by bicycle and six per cent by bus. “With over 20 per cent of respondents travelling from outside Albury-Wodonga city limits to work and study, this provides a barrier to a large increase in the use of buses and bikes. However, a number of people who live in Albury-Wodonga said they used their bikes or bus as their ‘second’ mode of transport, so we need to see what it will take to make them change their main modes of transport out to Thurgoona,” Mr Maher said. The research will help point to ways that show how CSU can become carbon ‘neutral’ by 2015. The research was carried out in 2012 and 2013 by Dr Gull Laird and Dr Rosemary Black from ILWS

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