Livestock Researchers learn Social Research in Timor

By Dr Joanne Millar

Livestock researchers and veterinary workers get to grips with social research in West Timor

Course participants, facilitators and farmers in West Timor.

Course participants, facilitators and farmers in West Timor.

‘Learning by doing’ is the catch cry term often applied to farmer learning- but it also the best way for research and extension staff to learn social research methods so they can improve their work with farmers. An enthusiastic group of 28 livestock researchers and veterinary practitioners from West Timor in Indonesia participated in a four day ‘learning by doing’ training course from 12-15 October 2015 in Kupan.  The course was facilitated by social scientists, Dr Joanne Millar from Charles Sturt University, NSW and Dr Muktasam Abdurrahman from Mataram University, Indonesia.

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Surveys, gorillas and a mountain climb

A/Prof Rosemary Black

A/Prof Rosemary Black

Well, the past two weeks have flown by and Angel and I have been very busy completing the community surveys across the two sectors. It’s a large area so we have tried to ensure that we have covered as many people as possible, including trekking to communities on the Volcanoes National Park boundary and into outlying villages. The early rains have started and so we’ve been caught in a few heavy showers – but I bought a great multi-coloured umbrella from the local market which has been helpful in the sun and rain! We’ve now finished all the 50 household community surveys. So that is the end of the data collection for this research project. Read more of this post

Research in Rwanda, it is not just the gorillas

Into the verdant volcanoes area of Rwanda

Dr Black

Dr Black

As we climbed out of Kigali on to one of the ridges leading north-west to the Volcanoes National Park area I was surprised to see the lush, green landscape spreading out across the ridges and valleys way into the distance. This landscape contrasted dramatically with northern Botswana where I have just spent three weeks – that is dry, dusty and sandy with sparse vegetation except along the rivers. The other thing that surprised me was the intense patchwork of small fields cultivated with sorghum, chillies, and beans and at higher altitudes Irish potatoes (as they are known here). This intense cultivation reflects Rwanda’s high population density of 477 people per square kilometre. Compare that with the USA of 35 and Australia of 3.

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Bunking in.. adventures doing research

The next instalment of Dr Rosemary Black’s AWF research  

BLOG episode 2 12/9/14.

The village of Parakarungu

The village of Parakarungu

Life and research in the villages

As I mentioned in my last blog the last two villages that I am surveying are Satau and Parakarungu. As these villages are so far from Kasane where I am staying, Georginah’s (my translator) mother has kindly offered to let us stay at her house for a few days to save me doing the long drive back and forth. Read more of this post

Nepal – The country of extremes

Pics and story by PhD student
Jennifer Sherry

A bird's-eye view of the dramatic landscape around the village of Na

A bird’s-eye view of the dramatic landscape around the village of Na

Nepal is a country of extremes. Nestled between the two populous Asian giants, China and India, the country’s northern border parallels the most awe-inspiring strip of the largest mountain range in the world: the Himalaya.

The geographic location and dramatic landscape have undoubtedly shaped the cultures and lifestyles of inhabitants from the low-lying plains of the tropical Terai to the high altitude mountain valleys. Kathmandu, the capital city and international travel hub, is a mosaic of over-stimulating colors, sights, sounds, smells, tastes, temperatures, and cultures. Heading to the remote mountain regions after a stay in the frenetic city requires yet another round of remarkable mental and physical adjustments. These transitions appear to occur more seamlessly for locals than for bewildered western visitors, who fit less comfortably through half-sized doorways, sit less comfortably on bumpy bus rooftops, and apprehensively negotiate throneless bathrooms.
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Australian Landcare helps fish in Laos

children-planting

Enthusiastically planting trees

Lao Fish Passage project gets boost from links with Landcare

Near the tiny village of Pak Peung nestled on the banks of the mighty Mekong River in Laos, the sound of excited school childen fills the humid tropical air. They are planting trees donated by the Yea Wetland Group in Victoria, Australia. It is World Environment Day 2014 and the children are joined by local government officials, University researchers, fisheries scientists and villagers. Everyone is pitching in, planting 500 trees and grasses to stabilise the banks of the new Fish Passage, a strange looking structure of conical posts set in a concrete channel.

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Australia’s Landcare under international scrutiny

Photo from Left Dr Kazuki Kagohashi, Research Fellow from Nanzan University ; Rob Youl, President of Australian Landcare International; Prof Toshio Kuwako, Tokyo Institute of Technology (and Tomomi’s supervisor); Prof Allan Curtis, ILWS; Tomomi Maekawa, a visiting student scholar (Doctoral) from Tokyo Institute of Technology, and in Australia for a year based here at CSU’s Albury-Wodonga campus; and Prof Michael Seigel, from the Nanzan Institute for Social Ethics, Nanzan University.

Photo from Left Dr Kazuki Kagohashi, Research Fellow from Nanzan University ; Rob Youl, President of Australian Landcare International; Prof Toshio Kuwako, Tokyo Institute of Technology (and Tomomi’s supervisor); Prof Allan Curtis, ILWS; Tomomi Maekawa, a visiting student scholar (Doctoral) from Tokyo Institute of Technology, and in Australia for a year based here at CSU’s Albury-Wodonga campus; and Prof Michael Seigel, from the Nanzan Institute for Social Ethics, Nanzan University.

Ms Tomomi Maekawa, who is a fellow with ILWS and PhD student with Tokyo Institute of Technology, was joined by her supervisor Professor Toshio Kuwako from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Professor Michael Seigel from Nanzan University and another Japanese expert, as well as the chair of Australian Landcare International Mr Rob Youl. During their stay on the Border, the visitors met with local Landcare groups and ILWS research professor Allan Curtis, Australia’s leading expert on the Landcare movement.

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